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Best Book Deals & Free PDF Download Trading Women's Health and Rights: Trade Liberalization and Reproductive Health in Developing Economies by Anju Malhotra

Trading Women's Health and Rights: Trade Liberalization and Reproductive Health in Developing Economies by Anju Malhotra

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Author
Anju Malhotra
Publisher
Zed Books
Date of release
Pages
320
ISBN
9781842777756
Binding
Paperback
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
5
30

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Trading Women's Health and Rights: Trade Liberalization and Reproductive Health in Developing Economies

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Book review

How do economic and trade policies shape public health? This book adds a new dimension to this global debate, by synthesizing research from various disciplines on how international trade liberalization affects reproductive health and rights. It reviews the direct and indirect linkages between the two, and then focuses in on how the linkages are mediated through women's employment, using case studies from Bangladesh, Egypt, Vietnam, China, Mexico and Sri Lanka. It takes up the issue of how trade liberalization affects government capacity to deliver reproductive health services, as illustrated by Tanzania, South Africa, and the international migration of nurses and midwives. It addresses the policy and advocacy issues for advocates of both reproductive health and rights and economic justice, and shows how trade agreements weighted against the poor in the South have very specific gendered consequences.


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